Over half of China food inspections fail the test

Several food scandals in China over the past quarter have placed pressure on brands to improve their food safety standards.

Several food scandals in China over the past quarter have placed pressure on brands to improve their food safety standards.

AsiaInspection (AI), a quality control service provider that partners with brands, retailers and importers around the world to secure, manage and optimise their supply chain, has announced its 2014 Q4 Barometer, a quarterly synopsis on outsourced manufacturing and the quality control services industry.

Several food scandals in China over the past quarter have placed pressure on brands to improve their food safety standards. The largest scandal involved expired meat being supplied to Yum! Brands and McDonalds. In another incident, Chinese police seized 30,000 tonnes of chicken feet that had been soaked in hydrogen peroxide.

AsiaFoodInspection, AI’s food quality control services arm, said this risk is translating to increased orders for food inspections, which grew 21.3% vs. the previous quarter and 30% year over year. Its data show that 51.7% of food inspections conducted between Q1 and Q3 2014 in China have failed.

“It is completely unacceptable for Chinese manufactured food to routinely put consumers at risk,” said Sebastien Breteau, AsiaInspection CEO. “The long-term solution is stricter government regulations and food inspections and testing at the source.”

China’s Food Safety Law is currently being re-drafted. Liability and stiff penalties have been increased significantly and the burden of proof will be placed on the manufacturer to prove that its food is compliant with food safety standards. The new system will also encourage whistleblowers with monetary rewards.